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Johny Greek Coffee Machine – 600 Watts Traditional Arabic Coffee Burner/ UK Plug/ Chrome/ AK/8-8-5 CHR/ Made in Greece – Discounted

Johny Greek Coffee Machine – 600 Watts Traditional Arabic Coffee Burner/ UK Plug/ Chrome/ AK/8-8-5 CHR/ Made in Greece

Johny AK/8-8-5 CHR Greek/Arabic Coffee Machine is a great coffee making pot and designed in stylish Chrome, looking good in any kitchen. It is a traditional coffee machine for brewing coffee in the sand (“hovoli”). The coffee burning machine has a rapid preparation time and is suitable for both professional and domestic use. The “hovoli” machine adjusts a traditional technique to the needs of the modern professional and provides exceptional coffee quality, due to stable operating temperature maintained by the hot sand..

. The ”HOVOLI” machine offers a heating element of 600W cast in aluminium for ensuring constant temperatures, as well as transferring adequate heat for coffee brewing. A temperature regulator for monitoring temperature fluctuations of the temperature of the heating element. It comes with one small brass coffee pot and one bag of special sand.

This Johny coffee machine is proudly made in Greece and comes with one year warranty and friendly customer service in English.

  • Professional and domestic use: Traditional coffee machine for brewing coffee in the sand (“hovoli”) and rapid coffee preparation
  • Powerful: A heating element of 600W cast in aluminium for constant temperature and adequate heat transfer for the coffee brewing
  • Stylish: Impressive eye-catching and shiny coffee machine designed in chrome
  • Safe to use: Temperature regulator for monitoring temperature fluctuations of the temperature of the heating element
  • Extra: UK plug, one small brass coffee pot, one bag of special sand, one year manufacture warranty and friendly customer service in English

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Toyota C-HR Koba AWD 2017 review: family test

Everyone had something to say about this car. From the moment I picked it up, to the moment I dropped it off a week later, I got comments from just about everyone who saw it – family, friends, neighbours, my physio, even the garbage men who saw us shooting this video and just had to come over and ask what it was… this car is a talking point. And that’s because it’s different.

The C-HR[1] launched in early 2017 into the small SUV market[2], going up against cars like the Mazda CX-3[3] and the Honda HR-V[4]. From a company known for its basic but solid vehicles, everyone sat up and took notice. But how does this seriously sporty car perform for a family?

I drove the Koba, which is the top of the range, and here are five things I loved over the week with my family of four, and five things I thought could do with some improvement.

1. The Look

People literally stopped me in the street to ask “what is that?” They were intrigued. It’s sportier than any regular SUV[5] on the road, and almost looks like a rally car, which in an SUV is an interesting concept.

It’s also really cool. You actually do feel a bit like you are driving a rally car when you’re inside. The colour combinations (I drove the charcoal, but there is a bright yellow version that’ll get your heart racing) with the shiny black roof is of particular note.

I mean, who or what is this car trying to be?

People literally stopped me in the street to ask “what is that?”. (image credit: Dean McCartney) The C-HR is sportier than any regular SUV on the road. (image credit: Dean McCartney)

This is the kind of car that you get when you’re in between life stages. You might already have a baby, or have one on the way, or have very young children. You know you should be thinking about an SUV but you can’t quite bring yourself to plunge headfirst into a traditional ‘family’ looking vehicle, but a hatch is too small.

Fair enough. This car is for those people who have one toe in the family car category, and the rest of the foot firmly out of the family car category. There’s no reason to give it all up just because you have kids, you don’t need a boring car.

This car looks anything but boring.

2. The Zippiness

It’s a small engine, yes. A 1.2-litre turbo[6].

But it’s fun to drive – zippy, swifty, it gets you from A to B without any trouble at all. Handles well on corners. Is fast to take off or take over.

And when you’re driving a family around in suburbia, or you do a lot of city driving, the engine does its job superbly. The seats are comfortable, in the Koba they are leather accented and also heated. (image credit: Dean McCartney)

3. The Interior Space

When I first saw it, I was a bit concerned that my four-year old and six-year old would be squished, or wouldn’t find it comfortable.

But climb inside, because the interior is surprisingly spacious. There’s enough legroom in the front, and enough space in the back for a whole family of four to fit comfortably. Even a third child in the back would be fine.

There’s no extra space like a Kluger[7], granted, but when you don’t need it, you don’t miss it. This is a small SUV and there is definitely enough room for the four us to fit without feeling like we’re in a too-tight jar.

4. The Fuel Consumption

Another big tick from the family car reviewer.

If the fuel is cheap, everyone’s happy, right? And a small 1.2L engine uses less fuel than a bigger one. Toyota claims a 6.5L/100km on the combined cycle[8], and on the last two Cars Guide tests, we got 7.7L and 7.9 L respectively.

That’s certainly on the cheaper end of good.

5. The Safety

The C-HR has seven airbags, including side curtain airbags for the back passengers. There are two ISOFIX points[9] in the back, plus three top tether points.

It comes with Auto Emergency Brakes[10], which means the car will stop for you if you happen to be distracted (though it doesn’t work if you’re travelling under 20km/h, so watch yourself in slow traffic). Plus it comes with a bunch of other things – blind spot monitoring[11], a reverse parking camera[12], and front and rear parking sensors, active cruise control[13], and a lane departure system[14] that will take over the steering if it can sense you’re drifting. Now for the five things I thought could do with a bit more thinking on Toyota’s part[15].

1.

The Look

Yes, I know that’s also in the positives, but I think the looks are appealing to a particular kind of customer, and that customer may not be everyone. It almost feels a little bit like a remote control car. Not real.

A bit Batman-y. The looks aren’t for everyone. (image credit: Dean McCartney) If it’s to your taste, great, and it certainly grew on me over the week – I loved that it was different.

But it won’t be everyone’s car of choice. If it’s not, go for the charcoal over the bright colours and wind the look down. The interiors too, were a bit OTT.

Brown panels over the black in front and on the back doors aren’t my thing.

2. The Back Rear Panels

Now, while there is enough space in the back, the way the car is designed and it’s sporty edge brings up the side panels at the rear to a point, which results in a triangular panel, right near the heads of the back passengers, where a bigger window would normally be. This brings a sense of darkness in the back seat.

While that’s cosy and certainly good if you want your kids to go to sleep, it takes away that sense of airiness, that sense of lightness. The back is not small, but those panels make it feel less spacious than it is. They also provide some visibility problems – I found myself craning my neck out more than once to make sure there were no cars coming.

It’s not poor visibility as such, but it’s not as good as it could be. So as long as you’re willing to sacrifice that for a sporty looking vehicle, you’ll be fine.

3. The Cabin Storage

I’m all about practicality.

Come on, I’m a mum. This means I needs places – note the plural – to stash my keys, sunnies, wallet and phone. But they are missing in this car.

There are two cupholders in the front and a bottle holder in each door, plus pockets behind the front seats. Oh, and a tiny shelf in the front for your phone. And that’s it.

There are two cupholders in the front and a bottle holder in each door. (image credit: Dean McCartney) I found myself chucking all my stuff in the cupholders – everything from the girls’ hair elastics to my keys and sunnies, which meant that the cupholders didn’t actually function as cupholders. More storage would be ideal.

4.

The Rear Air Vents

This wasn’t a huge problem, because the car is small, so the air does travel to the back quite well, but it’s just something Toyota could have done better than the competition. Most of the other small SUVs don’t have rear air vents either, and this could have been one easy way to one-up them in their already established market foothold, but they didn’t. I’m voting yes to rear air vents because my children get hot in their car seats.

5.

The Good News

The good new is, there was no number five. I couldn’t think of another thing I was so unhappy with that I had to write about it. It also means the good outweighs the bad if you’re a fan of pros and cons lists (clearly I am).

For a more detailed review, click here[16].

References

  1. ^ The C-HR (www.carsguide.com.au)
  2. ^ small SUV market (www.carsguide.com.au)
  3. ^ Mazda CX-3 (www.carsguide.com.au)
  4. ^ Honda HR-V (www.carsguide.com.au)
  5. ^ regular SUV (www.carsguide.com.au)
  6. ^ 1.2-litre turbo (www.carsguide.com.au)
  7. ^ Kluger (www.carsguide.com.au)
  8. ^ 6.5L/100km on the combined cycle (www.carsguide.com.au)
  9. ^ ISOFIX points (www.carsguide.com.au)
  10. ^ Auto Emergency Brakes (www.carsguide.com.au)
  11. ^ blind spot monitoring (www.carsguide.com.au)
  12. ^ reverse parking camera (www.carsguide.com.au)
  13. ^ active cruise control (www.carsguide.com.au)
  14. ^ lane departure system (www.carsguide.com.au)
  15. ^ Toyota’s part (www.carsguide.com.au)
  16. ^ click here (www.carsguide.com.au)

Review: Toyota C-HR – ContractHireAndLeasing.com

The Toyota C-HR is an interesting, refreshing and solid addition to the crossover segment. With futuristic head-turning looks, hybrid drive and no diesel option, it really is a car for the image conscious. Some call this car overdesigned.

Some think it looks subtly futuristic. All we know is it turns a lot of heads when you drive by in it. While Toyota certainly have some bragging rights having cornered the small SUV market with the original RAV4 way back when, it took them a bit longer to catch up to the rest of the world in launching a compact crossover.

Now that it’s here, how does the C-HR hold up? 2016_Toyota_C-HR_EXT_STAT_15

For the driver, the refinement on offer really is fantastic and the quality of the cabin jumps out at you. The abbreviated Coupe High Rider is exactly that and a fine way in which the Japanese manufacturer has looked to differentiate itself from others in the overcrowded market.

Its swooping roofline, rear three-quarter and hidden door handles in the rear window frames all help to drive home the coupe-esque looks of the model – meaning you can go elsewhere if you want an imposter-SUV-looking car – a style move which we thoroughly applaud. Step inside and it’s equally coupe-esque. With style rather than space the name of the game, as with any other coupe, the C-HR is vaguely reminiscent of the much larger BMW X6 in its offering.

It has the high ride-height lessees want from a crossover (albeit lower than rivals) while headroom is somewhat limited in the front and verging on claustrophobic in the back thanks to the high window-line of the rear doors. 2016_Toyota_C-HR_INT_03 This heavily styled rear end also makes it hard to see what’s behind you when reversing.

Toyota know this though, and that’s why a reversing camera comes as standard across each model. Phew. For the driver, the refinement on offer really is fantastic and the quality of the cabin jumps out at you.

The wraparound dashboard means everything is easily within reach, soft touch plastics are used throughout, while gloss black inserts which glitter in the sunlight add a nice touch of class. 2016_Toyota_C-HR_INT_01 Climate control, cruise control, automatic lights and wipers, an auto dimming rear view mirror and seven-inch touchscreen infotainment system all come as standard meaning it’s a very enticing offering.

Jumping up a spec from the basic Icon to Excel adds sat-nav, keyless entry, heated seats and power fold mirrors, while Dynamic goes a step further by adding LED headlamps and metallic paint.

What initially prompted us into reviewing the Toyota C-HR was not only how cool it looks but the fact that it has been gaining momentum in regard to leasing enquiries Toyota’s Touch 2 infotainment system, comes with your standard Bluetooth phone function, DAB radio and the like, and upgrading to Excel or Dynamic means you’ll also benefit from a sat-nav that offers live traffic updates. While the screen position on the dash is fine, the interface is rather cumbersome and it isn’t the most user-friendly system you’ll come across these days.

2016_Toyota_C-HR_EXT_STAT_02

A lot has been made about the C-HR sitting on the same platform and being powered by the same 1.8-litre petrol engine and electric motor as its Prius stablemate But which drivetrain do you want? With nary a diesel model in sight, your choice is limited to either a 113bhp 1.2-litre four-cylinder turbo petrol or a 122bhp 1.8 petrol-electric hybrid.

What initially prompted us into reviewing the Toyota C-HR was not only how cool it looks but the fact that it has been gaining momentum in regard to leasing enquiries – especially the hybrid version in light of the recent VED changes. 2016_Toyota_C-HR_EXT_STAT_19 While a lot has been made about the C-HR sitting on the same platform and being powered by the same 1.8-litre petrol engine and electric motor as its Prius stablemate, the fact that the C-HR is bigger and heavier does cause issues.

Where the hybrid does shine however is in its credentials.

The electric motors are smaller yet deliver a stronger power to weight ratio than any other manufacturer The hybrid takes longer to get up to speed than the petrol, while acceleration of any kind – be it gentle or heavy – results in the revs rising harshly and staying there while the engine screams until you’re up to the speed you need. It is rather unpleasant and is all down to the automatic gearbox.

At crawling and low speeds however the hybrid model is a pleasure, and the electric motor can power you along up to speeds of 15mph. On the flipside to this, the 1.2 petrol is comparatively refined and revs smoothly and while it has less power than the Hybrid the lack of an electric motor means it weighs less, so is paradoxically faster. 2016_Toyota_C-HR_INT_10

Weight further muddies the water between drivers trying to be green and getting the most refined option available. On 18 inch wheels the 1.2-litre petrol rides well with no body bounce along uneven roads, handling the pockmarked tarmac around town just as smoothly, whereas the additional weight of the hybrid means the suspension has a harder job to do on the very same alloys and it all feels rather unsettled.

It retains decent handling, accurate steering and a good level of comfort all thanks to the fact that the C-HR was developed solely with European drivers in mind. Where the hybrid does shine however is in its credentials.

The electric motors are smaller yet deliver a stronger power to weight ratio than any other manufacturer. On top of this the combined power output of the system is 120bhp, meaning you’ll struggle to find a better hybrid on the market. 2016_Toyota_C-HR_EXT_STAT_11

MPG is also another feather in its cap, with the stated combined MPG listed by Toyota as 72.4, with ours coming around in the 60s thanks to a lot of town driving in stop-star traffic and a couple of long motorway trips. No matter which engine is right for you, it retains decent handling, accurate steering and a good level of comfort all thanks to the fact that the C-HR was developed solely with European drivers in mind – this means it’s able to cope with the unique demands our twisty, tight and bumpy roads and is remarkably agile for something marketed in the compact crossover segment. All in all, the Toyota C-HR is an interesting, refreshing and solid addition to the leasing market.

It brings a unique look and appeal to a segment that is all starting to look a bit like attack of the clones, and while there are trade-offs no matter which drivetrain you opt for the level of kit on offer in its most basic guise and general refinement means you can do a lot worse.

Models tested:

Toyota C-HR Excel 1.2 CVT

Price: ?25,265
Top speed: 114 mph
0-62mph: 11.1 seconds
Official fuel economy: 47.9 mpg
CO2 emissions: 135 g/km
Car tax band: ?200 (1st year)
?140 standard
Insurance group: 15
Engine: 1197 cc
Luggage space:

377 rear seats up

Toyota C-HR Excel 1.8 Hybrid CVT

Price: ?26,585
Top speed: 105 mph
0-62mph: 11 secs
Official fuel economy: 72.4 mpg
CO2 emissions: 87 g/km
Car tax band: ?90 (1st year)
?130 standard
Insurance group: 14
Engine: 1798 cc
Luggage space:

255 rear seats up
1010 rear seats down