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Skoda Karoq First Review Says It's a Great Family Car With Soft Suspension

Skoda has become a hugely competitive company that annoys even Volkswagen. The Karoq could be one of its most important products, as a serious pick for family crossover buyers. But what do the reviews say? 6 photos
Well, this is the first one we’ve been able to find, and it suggests Skoda is on to a winner.

As the seasoned reviewer points out, the Karoq is a replacement for the Yeti. It’s obviously based on the MQB platform, just like the Kodiaq and Octavia.

While it’s technically an SUV, only one of the versions available right now is fitted with AWD. That’s the one we’d get, but not to do any off-roading.

The Nissan Qashqai didn’t have AWD at first either, and people still loved it. We think the Karoq looks more upmarket than the Yeti, and this has to do with design, not materials. A Range Rover Evoque is a premium car not because its plastics are better but because it looks a certain way.

This Skoda has the same timeless qualities as the Octavia.

The interior of the Karoq is more spacious than the Yeti. Skoda’s clever designers also made that infotainment screen shine by framing it with air vent trim. Volkswagen is probably the best company in the world when it comes to ergonomics.

The Karoq also benefits from buttons that are just in the right place and clean graphics. The gear shifter might seem like a step back, copying the hammer-like shape from stuff like the old Superb. But the clunkiness is excellent for a crossover, and the design is very intuitive.

You’re never going to kill people with this shifter as Jeep did! Perhaps the most important thing to take away from this review is the way the Karoq rides. It’s got long, soft suspension, which is bad for making high-speed corners but perfect for a family car.

Some MQB cars are crashy, so we’re getting excellent news here.

However, we just want to wait and see how the market reacts to this car before calling it a success.

Skoda Karoq First Review Says It's a Great Family Car With Soft Suspension

Skoda has become a hugely competitive company that annoys even Volkswagen. The Karoq could be one of its most important products, as a serious pick for family crossover buyers. But what do the reviews say? 6 photos
Well, this is the first one we’ve been able to find, and it suggests Skoda is on to a winner.

As the seasoned reviewer points out, the Karoq is a replacement for the Yeti. It’s obviously based on the MQB platform, just like the Kodiaq and Octavia.

While it’s technically an SUV, only one of the versions available right now is fitted with AWD. That’s the one we’d get, but not to do any off-roading.

The Nissan Qashqai didn’t have AWD at first either, and people still loved it. We think the Karoq looks more upmarket than the Yeti, and this has to do with design, not materials. A Range Rover Evoque is a premium car not because its plastics are better but because it looks a certain way.

This Skoda has the same timeless qualities as the Octavia.

The interior of the Karoq is more spacious than the Yeti. Skoda’s clever designers also made that infotainment screen shine by framing it with air vent trim. Volkswagen is probably the best company in the world when it comes to ergonomics.

The Karoq also benefits from buttons that are just in the right place and clean graphics. The gear shifter might seem like a step back, copying the hammer-like shape from stuff like the old Superb. But the clunkiness is excellent for a crossover, and the design is very intuitive.

You’re never going to kill people with this shifter as Jeep did! Perhaps the most important thing to take away from this review is the way the Karoq rides. It’s got long, soft suspension, which is bad for making high-speed corners but perfect for a family car.

Some MQB cars are crashy, so we’re getting excellent news here.

However, we just want to wait and see how the market reacts to this car before calling it a success.

Book Review: Find fiction focused on family and culture

“Before We Were Yours”

by Lisa Wingate

This historical fiction novel occurs within the three-decade scandal of the Tennessee Children’s Home Society. Beginning in the late 1930s, this adoption agency, under the leadership of Georgia Tann, kidnapped poor children and sold them to wealthy, often prestigious families.

The story is told through two families. The Foss family are river gypsies, living in a poor shanty boat.

The Stafford family lives a privileged and political life in South Carolina. These two families are connected in a way that no one could imagine.

“The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane”

Recommended Stories For You

by Lisa See

Lisa See has written another cultural masterpiece, and I loved it. This bestselling author immerses the reader into the Chinese tea culture, taking a fascinating look at the minority ethnic Ak’ha tribe, longtime cultivators of Pu’er Tea.

Drink in the rich Ak’ha tribe traditions and taboos.

Watch how this small beginning turns into a world-wide business. Now settle down with a cup of warm tea, drink the history of this medicinal tonic, and enjoy the story you are about to read. You will not be disappointed.

“Bear Town”

by Fredrik Backman

It takes a village to raise a child.

But what if the village, so imbedded in the culture of hockey, is more focused on winning than anything else? Who then is responsible for the outcome imposed on the children? Who become the real losers?

Fredrik Backman, author of several bestsellers including “A Man Called Ove,” has written a story about a small town hockey community that is entrenched within their high school hockey culture.

It is full of emotion and is unpredictable until the last page. In my opinion, this is Backman’s best novel yet. It is one of those books that I could not put down, and now I can’t stop thinking about it.

These books are available at the Bud Werner Memorial Library and Off the Beaten Path.

Virgie DeNucci is a bookseller at Off the Beaten Path.

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